The Laureates

2015:
Professor Anatoli Mikhailov, President and Founding Rector of the European Humanities University, Vilnius, Lithuania.

2014:
Romeo Dallaire, Canadian general and senator, founder of the Child Soldiers Initiative and author, and Kettly Noël, dancer and choreographer, creator of a centre for African contemporary dance in Bamako, Mali.

2010:
Kim Longinotto, British documentary filmmaker. The prize is given in recognition of Kim Longinotto’s outstanding film work over more than 30 years.

2008:
K.V. Wimalawardana and K. Kumaraveloo, principals of respectively a Sinhalese and a Tamil school in Deriniyagala, Sri Lanka, for their joint efforts to foster mutual understanding for Sinhalese and Tamil culture. The entire prize money was used to construct two buildings on the respective school premises for theatre, assembly and classes. The two buildings are named the “Edita Morris Memorial Hall”. The two schools are over a hundred years old. The new buildings are destined to honour the name of Edita Morris for centuries to come.

2006:
Elena Nemirovskaya, Russian founder and Director of the Moscow School of Political Studies, for the development of civic culture, political dialogue, deliberative democracy and respect for human rights in Russia and other post-Soviet countries.

2004:
Borka Pavićević, founder of the Centre for Cultural Decontamination in Belgrade, for her cultural activities in order to promote tolerance, reconciliation and respect for human rights in the former Yugoslavia; additional awards: Biljana Srbljanović and Jasmina Tesanović, Serbian authors and peace activists.

2001:
Donald Kenrick, British Romani linguist, Valdemar Kalinin, Belarussian Roma writer and poet,, Roberto Ciulli, German theatre director and founder of the Theater an der Ruhr, and Rahim Burhan, a founder of the Roma Theatre Prilipe in Skopje, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, for their work in promoting understanding for the Roma culture and language.

1998:
John Kani , South African playwright and theatre director, for his work with cultural integration in cooperation with people from different ethnic communities, and Antjie Krog, South African poet and investigating journalist, for her efforts to make the truth and reconciliation process in South Africa understood.

1996:
Xavier Albó , Spanish-born Bolivian Jesuit priest and anthropologist, and Félix Layme Pairumani, Bolivian university professor, for their work on the Spanish-Quechua and Spanish-Aymara dictionaries in Bolivia and for translating Bolivian and Peruvian laws, and Carolyn Forché, American poet, for her efforts to combat torture and genocide in El Salvador.

1995:
Akihiro Takahashi, Japanese atom bomb survivor and former Head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and Director of the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation.

1994:
Aziz Nesin, secular Turkish writer, for his resistance to political and religious fundamentalism, and Mohamed Talbi, Tunisian historian and a devout Muslim, for his efforts to promote dialogue between Muslims and Christians.

1993:
Marion Kane and Vivienne Anderson, both British, for their efforts to promote dialogue between Catholic and Protestant women in Northern Ireland.

1992:
Sonja Licht, Serbian sociologist and political activist, for promoting peaceful cooperation between the different communities in former Yugoslavia, and Tanja Petovar, lawyer and human rights activist.

1991:
Muhammad Abu-Zaid, Palestinian doctor and founder of the Palestinian Centre for Jewish Studies, for his work on promoting cultural understanding as means for peace, and Galit Hasan-Rokem on behalf of the Israeli Women's Peace Net, for their efforts to promote cooperation between Palestinian and Israeli women.

1990:
Kerstin Blomberg, Swedish district nurse and promoter of international understanding among young persons round the Baltic, Jesús Alcalá, Swedish lawyer and human rights activist, Eva Moberg, Swedish writer and journalist, Harald Ofstad, Norwegian university professor and philosopher, Peter Watkins, British film director and writer.